Collations for The Life and Death of Jason

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Collation Book 1

      D Text
title page A

B, B2, B3, C all same  

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JASON,
A POEM. BY
WILLIAM MORRIS. ARGUMENT.

 

title

B, B2, C:

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JASON. ARGUMENT.

B3: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JASON.  
Argument A: he would then give up the kingdom to him B, B2, C: right B3 lacks the B text argument rights.
A: Colchis     Colchis
A: Creu[sa] Glauce B: Glaucé (and in successive instances except where noted)   Glauce
A, B, B2, C: Ægeus     Aegeus
A, B [missing]     Jason having grown
up to manhood in the
woods, is warned of
what his life shall be.
A, B, B2, B3, C:     caps through I.5
[lower case]     THEY
I.1 sounding     tumbling
I. 9 Where shaggy bears B, B2, B3, C   Where bears and wolves
I.13 A, B, B2, B3: that each day     greath of girth,
I.14A, B, B2, B3: Grew great, until all these were passed away,     that daily waxed, till these had left the earth,
I.17 A, B, C: Æson [and in succeeding cases except where noted]     Aeson
I.18A: Who in unhappy days     Whom, in unhappy days
I.21 A, B: This Pelias, being covetous and strong     This Pelias, being both covetous and strong
I.29A all this this [sic] a     all this a
I.30A: And when his state thus fell from good to bad     Of whom he thought when good had fallen to bad;
I.31A, B: He thought, Though Pelias leave me now alone,     Though Pelias doth to-day my life endure,
I.32 A, B: Yet he may wish to make quite sure this throne     Yet may he crave to make his kingship sure
I.33 A, B: By slaying me and mine, some evil day;     Some morrow yet by slaying sire and son:
I.34 A, B: Therefore the child will I straight send away,     Threfore will I send forth the little one,
I.47 A,B: Cheiron B3:Chiron   Chiron
I.63 A, B: Then leave the child with him, and come to me,     Then leave the child with him; and fear no whit
I.64A, B: Minding what words the Cenaur saith to thee;     But all the Centaur saith, give ear to it
I.65A: But of him needs thou have no whit of fear. Of whom thou needest have no whit of fear;   And tell me all: now bring the child in haste;
I.66A, B: And, ere thou goest, bring me the child here." B: Of whom thou needest have no whit of fear;   Dusk grows the w orld, and day is weary-faced.
I.74 A, B: fair     bright
I.75 A, B: said     spake
I.76A: "Oh Child, I pray the Gods to spare thine head B: "O child, I pray the Gods to spare thine head   "Oh head beloved, I pray thou mayst not ache
I.77A: The burden of a crown, were it not good B: The burden of a crown; were it not good   With bearing of the crown; were it not good
I.84A: leopards B: leopard's   panther's
I.86 A: some deep green rill     some green rill
I.91 A, B: find     hap
I. 92 A: In some wood-fair grassy place the wood nymphs kind, B: In some fair grassy place, the wood-nymphs kind,   On the kind nymphs in the mountain's lap,
I.95 A: shall there be to thee,     thre shall come to thee,
I. 105 A: And saddled in the court the stout horse stout B: And saddled in the court the stout horse stood   So men to Aeson's door the war-horse led
I.106A to the Centaur's wood B: to the Centaur's wood;   from the gates of dread,
I.107 A: And the sla[ve] tried slave stood ready by his lord B: And the tried slave stood ready by his lord,   And by the godlike Aeson stood the slave,
I.108 A: sword B: sword   glaive
I.114 A: When, being mounted forth into the night B: then, being mounted, forth into the night   At last, being mounted, forth into the night
I.115 A: has B: has   hath
I.121 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chrion
I.130 A: come from Eubœan cliffs, was had just begun     Come from Eubœan cliffs, had just begun
I.132 A: thorns B: thorns   thorn
I.137A: that glittered all of gold B: all glittering of gold,   all glittering of bright gold,
I.138 A: sculptor     cunning
I.140 A: grew     drew
I.143 A: abroard     abroad
I.149 A: bore     bare
I.153 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chrion
I.154 A: Æsons     Æson's
I.157 A: [It] were a vain thing truly if I strove     A vain thing were it, truly, if I strove,
I.166A: That folk may of whom this boy was born     That folk may know of whom this boy was born
I.168 A: And set lay between my arms the noble child B: And lay between my arms the noble child C. Lay now between my arms the noble child Lay now bewteen my arms the noble child
I.177 A: unto Iolchus     on toward Iolchos
I.181 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.183 A: Should so have been born, spring; and so he passed his days     Should thus have sprung; and so he passed his days
I.185 A. And now was Pelias mindful of the day B: And now was Pelias mindful of the day   But memory of the day still Pelias bore,
I.186 A: When from the altars horns he drew away     When from the altar's very horns he tore
I.190 A: No pleasing victim, there she was offered up     No pleasing victim, she was offered up
I.191 A: that he B: that he   indeed
I. 192 A: Though sprung from him who rules the restless sea I: Though sprung from him who rules the restless sea,   That he, the king, the Earth-begirder's seed,
I.210 A: From Argos back     Back from the north
I.218 A: still B: still   ever
I.219 A: with     in
I.221 A: guards, and for the rest began     guards: a terror to his folk
I.222 A: To be a terror unto every man. B: To be a terror unto every man.   He grew to be, and grinding was his yoke.
I.224 A: grew B: grew   waxed
I.225 A: In strength and comeliness from day to day B: In strength and comeliness from day to day,   And day by day fairer he was to sight,
I.226 A: passed his childish years away. B: passed his childish years away.   grew in manhood and in might:
I.227 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.230 A: And how to find the within the marshy steads     And how to find within the marshy steads
I.236 A: leopards     leopard's
I.241 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.246 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.251 A: the lore     sweet tales
I.251 A: Then     But
I.257 A: to     unto
I.259 A: Moreover Cheiron B: Moreover, Cheiron   Moreover, Chiron
I.265 A: noisy B: noisy   crooked
I.268 A: moonlight     moonlit
I.271 A: Cheiron B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.278 A: Can guard the wound that never can healed     Can guard thee from the wound that ne'er is healed
I.284 A: screeching     wailing
I.309 B: fair girl's   maiden's
I.317 B: behold!   behold
I.323 B: Cheiron   Chiron
I.328 B: Cheiron [and in successive instances]   Chiron
I.333 B: my   mine
I.338 B: wavering and dim;   wavering, faint, and
I.347 B: he found laid there   at rest he found
I.348 B: thymy herbage fair,    
I.368 B: heavens clear."   heavens are clear.
I.376 B: furious and blind,   sudden, cold, and blind,
I.378 B: black   coal-black,
I.387 B: would   could
I.388 B: tired   the spent
       
       
       
       

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